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This volume presents the work of an international group of academics from a range of disciplines including sociology, media and cultural studies, social anthropology and geography, all of whom are involved not only in thinking "culture" into the economy but thinking culture and economy together. I am a co-editor of the new Journal of Cultural Economy. Account Options Sign in. My library Help Advanced Book Search. View eBook.

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Paul du Gay , Michael Pryke. From inside the book. Contents Notes on contributors. Preview — Cultural Economy by Paul du Gay.

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Michael Pryke Editor. Phrases such as "corporate culture," "market culture" and the "knowledge economy," have now become familiar clarion calls in the world of work.

They are calls that have echoed through organizations and markets. Clearly something is happening to the ways markets and organizations are being represented and intervened in and this signals a need to reassess their very constitu Phrases such as "corporate culture," "market culture" and the "knowledge economy," have now become familiar clarion calls in the world of work. Clearly something is happening to the ways markets and organizations are being represented and intervened in and this signals a need to reassess their very constitution. In particular, the once clean divide that placed the economy, dealt with mainly by economists, on one side, and culture, addressed chiefly by those in anthropology, sociology and the other "cultural sciences," on the other, can no longer hold.

This volume presents the work of an international group of academics from a range of disciplines including sociology, media and cultural studies, social anthropology and geography, all of whom are involved not only in thinking "culture" into the economy but thinking culture and economy together. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages.

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  7. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. This book is an important reminder of three significant things in contemporary political and academic debates: first, the ubiquity of the label cultural, second, the complexity of that label, and third, in reading this 10 years after it was published and 12 years after the seminar series it was based on, of just how long that ubiquitous, complex and in many instances unhelpful label has been around.

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    One of the few things this impressive set of authors agrees on is that any attempts to create separate spheres that may be labelled culture and the economy are futile; each is interwoven with the other — but that is about it. Angela McRobbie casts a trenchant eye over some sociological and journalistic claims to be making sense of and celebrating the cultural economy to draw attention to the lack of capital in many of those sectors and therefore the insecurity and perilousness of work in those sectors — although it is not a term that was in use 10 years ago, she is tracing the shape of the precariat and the contours of precariousness.

    Finally, Liz McFall makes a powerful case for taking account of the contexts of production in making sense of meaning, and criticises so much of what we see in cultural analysis that attends to the text but not the institutions of its production. As with any collection of papers, the book as a whole is uneven, but it is a rich and intriguing set of ideas that demand new ways of thinking about economic processes and even now, after a decade, challenges both political economy and cultural studies to look at each other anew and ask some difficult and demanding new questions.